Scott Fraser: The Problem With Eyewitness Testimony (Video)

In this talk forensic neurophysiologist Scott Fraser discusses the unreliability of eyewitness testimony. He explains that we only encode and store bits and pieces of information, and that the brain fills in the gaps with data that was not originally collected. Fraser states that all our memories are reconstructions, and are influenced by inference, speculation and information gained after the observation.

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10 Free Online Psychology Courses and Lectures

college courses onlineIf you’re a psychology student or you’re just plain interested in learning more about psychology in general, you should know that there are a large number of online resources to educate you on this complex and fascinating subject. Highlighted for you here are 10 online psychology courses and lectures for you to study on your own, and what’s more–they’re free.

Introduction to PsychologyFreeVideoLectures.com hosts this free video–a lecture presented by Professor Paul Bloom of Yale University. In this thorough and thought provoking introduction to psychology, Professor Bloom covers the five principal areas of psychology: neuroscience, development, cognitive, social, and clinical. This introductory lecture also aims to answer many common questions regarding the human mind and it’s correlation with behavior. Continue reading “10 Free Online Psychology Courses and Lectures” »

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The Power of Perspective: Nelson Mandela Sculpture

Nelson Mandela steel sculpture Marco Cianfanelli

In the image above, artist Marco Cianfanelli shows us that 50 steel columns can become so much more than mere metal, if they are viewed from the right perspective. The sculpture was created to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Nelson Mandela’s arrest by the apartheid police.

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Rory Sutherland: Sweat the Small Stuff (Video)

In this video Rory Sutherland talks about the importance of perspective in achieving success. He argues that big problems do not necessarily require big fixes and that by paying attention to the details, we can often find simpler, cheaper and better solutions.

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