Tag Archives: depression

Mental Illness Linked To Increased Chronic Physical Conditions

medical checkupA study compiled by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) has found that adults who have experienced mental illness in the previous year were more likely to suffer from certain physical illnesses than those who maintained good mental health. Conditions such as heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure and diabetes had increased rates of occurrence in individuals who experienced mental disorders or major depressive episodes in the past year.

Of those who reported any kind of mental illness, 21.9% had high blood pressure compared to 18.3% of persons who reported no mental health problems. Asthma also increased significantly from 10.6% (with good mental health) to 15.7% (with poor mental health). Continue reading

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Treating Psychological Erectile Dysfunction

Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a characterized by a regular inability to obtain and/or maintain an erect penis during sexual activity. Psychological factors account for 10-20% of all erectile dysfunction cases and are often secondary components in situations where physical causes of the dysfunction are present. Continue reading

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Parenting and Depression among Children/Adolescents: A Brief Literature Review

sad child hugging momVarious studies have recorded a significant link between depression and parenting styles characterized by low care and high control (McGinn, Cukor, & Sanderson, 2005; Mezulis, Hyde, & Abramson, 2006).  Using the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI) developed by Parker, Tupling and Brown (1979, cited in Enns, Cox & Clara, 2002) , McGinn et al. (2005) were able to separate adolescents into four categories according to the style of parenting by which they were raised. One of these categories, affectionless control, closely resembles the authoritarian parenting style in Baumrind’s classification system and is characterized by low care and high overprotection. McGinn et al. (2005) found that persons exposed to this parenting style were more depressed than persons who experienced a different style of parenting.  Another group of researchers (Radziszewska, Richardson, Dent, & Flay, 1996, cited in McPherson, 2004) found that uninvolved (or neglectful) parenting was associated with the highest level of depressive symptoms among adolescents while the authoritative parenting style was significantly related to lower symptom levels. Continue reading

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What is Depression?

woman with depressionEver felt “down in the dumps?” Ever had a “case of the blues?” Ever been completely “down and out?” If you answered yes to any of these questions, then relax. You only proved that you’re normal. Whether it’s the result of a major break-up, the loss of a pet, or those crazy female hormones that will get any boyfriend/husband walking on eggshells, sadness is normal. Ask anyone you meet and chances are they will tell you that at some point in their life, they’ve felt depressed. But “feeling depressed” is not the same thing as “having depression.” While a depressed mood must be present for a diagnosis of depression, it is only one of the many symptoms of this disorder. In other words, “feeling depressed” is necessary but not sufficient for a diagnosis of depression. Continue reading

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