Tag Archives: relationships

5 Tips for Improving Your Love Life

love life husband wifeThe majority of us have been there…stuck in a rut, so to speak, in a relationship that has lost its luster. Sure, you’re still in love, but there’s just something missing when it comes to the sexual side of things. You’re in luck though, as we’ve compiled a few tips and tricks for improving your love life and adding that sparkle back into that well-aged relationship.

 

Tip #1 – Nights out on the town = spicier nights in the bedroom. 

Getting out of the house can bring a little bit of spice back into your love life. This is due to the fact that, while in our homes, we are surrounded by and constantly reminded of the everyday things in life. When trying to make passionate love there, you might tend to think of other matters: did I pay the electric bill or wouldn’t this room look great in red? Allowing yourself to be in the moment is a key element in being truly intimate with someone. When your mind wanders, so will your intimacy. Continue reading

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Treating Psychological Erectile Dysfunction

Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a characterized by a regular inability to obtain and/or maintain an erect penis during sexual activity. Psychological factors account for 10-20% of all erectile dysfunction cases and are often secondary components in situations where physical causes of the dysfunction are present. Continue reading

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Giving is its Own Reward

sexy woman and manOr so the researchers at UCLA would have us believe. Assistant professor of psychology Naomi Eisenberger and psychology graduate Tristen Inagaki performed an experiment on 20 heterosexual couples in romantic relationships at UCLA’s Ahmanson-Lovelace Brain Mapping Center.

In the experiment, each boyfriend received painful electric shocks while his girlfriend’s brain activity was monitored using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Inagaki and Eisenberger “explored the potentially beneficial effects of support giving by examining the neural substrates of giving support to a loved one.” They “focused on a priori regions of interest in the ventral striatum and septal area (SA) because of their role in maternal caregiving behavior in animals” (Inagaki and Eisenberger, 2012). Continue reading

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