Tag Archives: parenting

Why Do Good Girls Like Bad Guys?

why do good girls like bad guysIt is a phenomenon that has baffled mothers, fathers and the classic “nice guys” throughout human history, but perhaps no one expresses the paradox quite as eloquently as acclaimed rapper Earl Simmons, better known to his fans as DMX – “Why do good girls like bad guys? Knowin’ that bad guys tell mad lies…”

Indeed, it is a truly profound question, one for which there is no simple answer. Nevertheless, researchers have uncovered one factor which appears to play a major role in this phenomenon – ovulation! Various studies (e.g. Gangestad, Simpson, Cousins, Garver-Apgar, & Christensen, 2004, cited in Durante, Griskevicius, Simpson, Cantu & Li, 2012; Thornhill & Gangestad, 2008, cited in Durante et al., 2012) have found that ovulating women have an increased desire for the prototypical sexy cads – men who are attractive, dominant and who live on the edge – even though these men may not be interested in a long term relationship. Continue reading

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5 Ways a Baby’s First Year Impacts His/Her Future

mother kisses baby

Have you recently had a baby? The first year might be hard on parents who are recovering from pregnancy and birth, dealing with sleepless nights and getting to know their newborn. It’s hard to imagine that this particular time period, which your child won’t consciously remember, has such a significant impact on his/her future development — but it does! Are you wondering what you can do to positively shape your child’s future in the first 12 months? Read on. Continue reading

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Parenting and Family Structure in Jamaica and the Wider Caribbean

jamaican childIn many Western countries, the nuclear family, in which both parents are members of the household, is believed to be ideal. In Jamaica and the wider Caribbean, however, the nuclear family is often the exception rather than the rule. A large proportion of families in the region still consist of only one parent, usually the mother, with fathers adopting a marginal role in child-care and nurturance. According to the UNICEF publication “Situation Analysis of Jamaican Children,” over 45% of the households in Jamaica are female-headed. Such family structures are generally accepted as the norm in the Caribbean, and are often viewed as functional responses to the problems faced by people living in the region. Continue reading

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