Author Archives: K. Coomarsingh

About K. Coomarsingh

K. Coomarsingh holds a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology and is a former lecturer at the Northern Caribbean University in Jamaica where she taught several undergraduate psychology courses, including Introduction to Psychology, Physiological Psychology and Introduction to Psychological Testing. She currently conducts psychological assessments of children across Jamaica.

The Link between Facebook and Depression

Depression

Regular Facebook use could contribute to depressive symptoms, according to the results of one recent study. Continue reading

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The Stroop Effect Experiment

stroop effect

In a landmark experiment in 1935, John Ridley Stroop demonstrated a cognitive effect which has fascinated psychologists for centuries. In the first of a series of experiments reported in his dissertation, Stroop asked participants to read the names of a list of colour words (e.g. blue, red, etc) under two conditions. In the first condition, participants were asked to read words that were printed in black ink whereas in the other condition they were expected to read words which were printed in ink colours that did not match the color names. For example, the word blue may have been printed in red ink (i.e. blue – in this case, the correct answer would have been blue). In this experiment, Stroop found that there was no significant difference in performance between the two conditions. Continue reading

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Gender Differences in Depression and Aggression

male aggression female depression

While depression and aggression affect both males and females, gender differences in each of these conditions have frequently been noted in the literature. As it relates to depression in particular, Piccinelli & Wilkinson (2000) mentioned that there is a female preponderance in the prevalence, incidence and morbidity risk of this disorder. Continue reading

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Seasonal Changes in Music Preferences and Implications for the Music Industry

psychology of musicSummer, winter, autumn, spring

Oh what changes the seasons bring!

From falling leaves to an icy sting

To a sudden shift in the songs we sing

We all know the common saying: “For everything there is a season.” A season to laugh, a season to cry… and apparently a season to listen to certain types of music.  At least that’s what the findings of two studies conducted by Pettijohn, Williams and Carter (2010) seem to suggest. Both studies, conducted in the United States, were designed to examine how seasonal conditions influence music preferences in a sample of male and female college students. Continue reading

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What is Educational Psychology?

schoolgirl taking exam

Educational psychology is the scientific field concerned with applying psychological theories and concepts to the understanding and improvement of teaching and learning in formal educational settings. In simpler terms, it is concerned with the study of how students learn and how teachers can help them to learn effectively. Educational psychology draws on and combines various psychological theories and principles – such as those related to human development, motivation, learning, behavior management and assessment, among others – in order to improve the conditions of teaching and learning. Educational psychologists study the process of learning not only among the general population but also among sub-groups such as gifted children and those with various learning disabilities. Continue reading

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Phobias: Definition, Types and Features

what is a phobiaAll of us, at one time or another, have experienced what it means to be afraid. Fear is a normal feature of human existence and serves an adaptive function in that it triggers reactions which allow us to respond to danger or threat. At times, however, fear can become excessive, disturbing and out of proportion with reality. Persons who experience such abnormal fear are described as having a form of anxiety disorder known as a phobia.

The term phobia refers to an intense, irrational fear of a particular object or situation, whether real or imagined. The fear is so severe that it interferes with the individual’s daily functioning, restricting their activities and causing much distress. In many cases, individuals experiencing phobias recognize that their fears are irrational but feel helpless to control them. Continue reading

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