Monthly Archives: July 2012

Human Perception: The Amazing Waterfall Illusion (Video)

Have you ever seen falling water come to a stop in mid-air? How about water flowing UP a waterfall? If you haven’t, then please watch this amazing video created by Youtube user “brusspup.” This is one of those incredible illusions that leaves observers gaping in wonder and completely lays bare the stark limitations of human perception. Continue reading

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Seasonal Changes in Music Preferences and Implications for the Music Industry

psychology of musicSummer, winter, autumn, spring

Oh what changes the seasons bring!

From falling leaves to an icy sting

To a sudden shift in the songs we sing

We all know the common saying: “For everything there is a season.” A season to laugh, a season to cry… and apparently a season to listen to certain types of music.  At least that’s what the findings of two studies conducted by Pettijohn, Williams and Carter (2010) seem to suggest. Both studies, conducted in the United States, were designed to examine how seasonal conditions influence music preferences in a sample of male and female college students. Continue reading

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Joshua Foer: How to Improve Your Memory

Journalist and memory expert Joshua Foer talks about an ancient technique called the memory palace and claims that anyone can improve their memory through the application of this and other cognitive tactics.

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Surprising Biological Markers of Autism

biological markers of autism

Autism is a disorder which impacts greatly upon a baby’s ability to mature and acquire normal social skills; the condition causes children to communicate in odd speech patterns such as speaking repetitively or echoing the speech of others. For some time scientists believed that autism could only be detected when a child had grown old enough to be able to speak with others. However recent studies conducted by researchers at the University of Kansas have suggested that autism may soon be detectable even before a child learns the alphabet. Continue reading

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