Monthly Archives: January 2012

What is Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)?

ADHD in childrenAttention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a childhood developmental disorder characterized by a persistent pattern of inattention and/or impulsivity and hyperactivity. These behaviours are more severe and occur more frequently than expected for a child’s age and developmental level. In order to be diagnosed ADHD, the pattern of inattention and impulsive/hyperactive behavior must be present in at least two settings (e.g., home and school). Additionally, some of the symptoms must have been evident before age 7. Although many individuals manifest symptoms of both inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity, some may display a predominance of one pattern over the other. Continue reading

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What is Conduct Disorder?

adolescent aggressionConduct disorder is a disorder of childhood and adolescence involving a persistent pattern of behavior in which social norms and rules, as well as the rights of others, are repeatedly violated. Children with this disorder may be described as cruel, impulsive, aggressive and out to control. The symptoms of the disorder are typically grouped into four main categories according to the diagnostic criteria outlined in the DSM-IV. Continue reading

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5 Popular Myths about Sleep

woman asleepThere are few things in life more satisfying than a good night’s sleep. Not only is sleep restful, it also gives our body the needed time to perform routine maintenance, repair itself and form long term memories. But how much do we really know about sleep? Better yet, how much do we THINK we know? Check out these 5 popular myths about sleep that we might once have accepted as scientific facts. Continue reading

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Beware the Sinister side of Low-Fat Foods

low fat strawberry yogurtWhat on earth could be bad about eating low-fat foods? Quite a lot, as it turns out. Food psychologists Brian Wansink and Pierre Chandon (2006) have discovered that foods labeled as “low fat” can lead to increased consumption and contribute significantly to obesity. How does that happen? The researchers point to two major reasons:

  1. Low fat foods increase perceptions of the appropriate serving size
  2. Low fat foods decrease consumption guilt

In their study, Wansink and Chandon (2006) showed that “all people – particularly those who are overweight – eat more calories of snack food when it is labeled as low fat than when it is labeled as regular.” Food nutrition labels can provide both objective and subjective consumption cues. Objective labels tell us exactly how much of a particular food constitutes a single serving and discreetly packaged items such as a 12 ounce can of soda, make the recommended serving size pretty obvious. Continue reading

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