Tag Archives: anxiety

10 Psychological Tips for Better Penalty Kicks

Psychology of penalty kicks

Psychology plays an important role in winning football matches and ultimately football titles. “If I could go back in time I’d go to the 2006 World Cup and bring along a mental coach to work with the players on taking penalties. England did have a mental problem with that” – former England manager Sven Goran Eriksson (Little, 2012). Continue reading

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Phobias: Definition, Types and Features

what is a phobiaAll of us, at one time or another, have experienced what it means to be afraid. Fear is a normal feature of human existence and serves an adaptive function in that it triggers reactions which allow us to respond to danger or threat. At times, however, fear can become excessive, disturbing and out of proportion with reality. Persons who experience such abnormal fear are described as having a form of anxiety disorder known as a phobia.

The term phobia refers to an intense, irrational fear of a particular object or situation, whether real or imagined. The fear is so severe that it interferes with the individual’s daily functioning, restricting their activities and causing much distress. In many cases, individuals experiencing phobias recognize that their fears are irrational but feel helpless to control them. Continue reading

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5 Tips For Managing Stress in the Office

occupational stressThere’s a sense of comradery when it comes to stress in the workplace, with the boss usually being the stressor and the subordinates, the sufferers. Coping with stress is never an easy task and employees often struggle at managing stress in the office environment because they are simply too busy being stressed.

Working in high stress environments increases the risk of both suffering physical illness or symptoms of psychological distress (Cooper & Cartwright, 1994; Cooper & Payne, 1988, cited in Clarke & Cooper, 2004), and also work-related accidents and injuries (Sutherland & Cooper, 1991, cited in Clarke & Cooper, 2004). Continue reading

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